Monday, June 17, 2024

Is The Shingles Vaccine Safe

What Are The Advantages Of Getting The Shingles Vaccine

What You Should Know About Shingles Vaccines | Johns Hopkins Medicine

The shingles vaccine reduces your risk of getting shingles. Shingles causes a painful rash that usually develops on one side of your body or face. Some people describe the pain as an intense burning or shooting sensation. The rash is often a single strip that wraps around one side of your body or is on one side of your face. It consists of blisters that normally crust over in seven to 10 days. The rash generally clears up within a month.

Some people with shingles also experience additional symptoms including fever, headache, chills or upset stomach.

For some people, the pain from the rash can last for months or even years after the rash goes away. This long-term pain is called postherpetic neuralgia , and it is the most common complication of shingles.

Rare Side Effects Of The Shingles Vaccine

In rare cases, a severe allergic reaction called anaphylaxis may occur. This can be a life-threatening emergency and requires immediate medical attention.

Symptoms of anaphylaxis after receiving the shingles vaccine include:

Typically, these side effects appear immediately or within a few minutes of vaccination your vaccination provider may be present. If you experience them after leaving the office, call 911.

Who Shouldn’t Get A Shingles Vaccine

The CDC says some people shouldn’t get the shingles vaccine. That includes those who:

  • Have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine or after a dose of Shingrix
  • Tested negative for VZV immunity
  • Currently have shingles
  • Have a severe or moderate acute illness, such as a respiratory infection

Your healthcare provider can answer any questions you have about whether the vaccine is safe for you.

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Tetanus Diphtheria And Pertussis Vaccines

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis are diseases caused by bacteria that can lead to serious illness and death.

  • Tetanus is caused by bacteria found in soil, dust, and manure. It can enter the body through a deep cut or burn.
  • Diphtheria is a serious illness that can affect the tonsils, throat, nose, or skin. It can spread from person to person.
  • Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, causes uncontrollable, violent coughing fits that make it hard to breathe. It can spread from person to person.

Getting vaccinated is the best way to prevent tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis. Most people get vaccinated as children, but you also need booster shots as you get older to stay protected against these diseases. The CDC recommends that adults get a Tdap or Td booster shot every 10 years. Ask a health care provider when you need your booster shot.

Shingles Disease And How To Protect Against It

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Shingles, or herpes zoster, is a painful skin rash that develops on one side of the face or body. It is caused by the varicella-zoster virus , the same virus that causes chickenpox. Anyone who has had chickenpox in the past can get shingles because VZV remains in the body after a person recovers from chickenpox. VZV can reactivate many years later, causing shingles.

Shingles is more common in older adults, people who have medical conditions that weaken the immune system, and people who take medications that suppress their immune systems. Getting vaccinated is the best way to prevent shingles.

Learn more about shingles.

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Kpwhri Researchers Analyzed Data From More Than 640000 Vaccine Doses To Understand Risk Of Severe Reactions

Newly published results support previous findings that the recombinant zoster vaccine Shingrix, recommended by the CDC for preventing shingles and its complications, is safe and unlikely to cause a serious reaction in healthy adults. The study, led by Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute Senior Investigator Jen Nelson, PhD, with Senior Investigator Lisa Jackson, MD, MPH, was published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

The findings bolster safety data from efficacy trials done before the vaccine was licensed and unsolicited reports from clinicians or people who received a vaccination shortly after the vaccine was rolled out in 2018.

“Its important to study vaccine safety in the period after a vaccine is released and is being administered widely throughout the population, and doing these types of studies soon after a vaccine is licensed has been a priority for the CDC for a long time, Nelson said. By paying attention during this early rollout period, we can confirm that what we’re seeing lines up with the early safety data and understand if theres anything happening that the clinical trials werent able to detect.”

Other KPWHRI co-authors on the study were Onchee Yu, MS, Andrea Cook, PhD, Rachael Burganowski, MS, and Erika Kiniry, MPH.

Secondary outcomes included local reactions such as pain or swelling at the injection site, systemic reactions like fever or muscle pain, gout, and inflammation of the heart muscle or lining.

Where Does The Shingles Vaccine Come From

Shingrix is made from a single protein, glycoprotein E, that comes from the outer shell of the herpes zoster virus . The vaccine contains no live or inactivated whole virus.

Shingrix also contains an adjuvanta substance that helps the body create a stronger immune response, so the vaccine works better. The adjuvant in Shingrix is a natural fat compound extracted from a Chilean soapbark tree.

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How Do You Catch Shingles

You do not “catch” shingles it comes on when there’s a reactivation of chickenpox virus that’s already in your body.

After you’ve recovered from chickenpox, the varicella-zoster virus lies dormant in your nerve cells and can reactivate at a later stage when your immune system is weakened.

Anyone who has had chickenpox can get shingles.

What Are The Side Effects

Shingles Vaccine Safe With Biologics

The shingles vaccines are very safe.

Common side effects to the vaccines include headache as well as soreness, redness and swelling where the vaccine was given. Itching and a rash may also occur after getting Zostavax® II. Other reactions that may occur after getting Shingrix® include fever, muscle soreness, fatigue, shivering, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

It is important to stay in the clinic for 15 minutes after getting any vaccine because there is an extremely rare possibility of anaphylaxis, which is a life-threatening allergic reaction. This may include hives, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the throat, tongue, or lips. The chance of true anaphylaxis is about 1 in 1 million vaccine doses. Should this reaction occur, your health care provider is prepared to treat it. Emergency treatment includes administration of epinephrine and transfer by ambulance to the nearest emergency department. If symptoms develop after you leave the clinic, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number. Learn more about anaphylaxis on our vaccine side effects page.

It is important to always report serious or unexpected reactions to your health care provider.

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Reporting Of Vaccine Adverse Events

Adverse events that occur in a patient following vaccination can be reported to the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System . Reporting is encouraged for any clinically significant adverse event even if it is uncertain whether the vaccine caused the event. Information on how to submit a report to VAERS is available at or by telephone at 1-800-822-7967.

* This recommendation became official CDC policy in January 2018.

Zoster vaccine live is no longer available for use in the United States, as of November 18, 2020.

§Grade 3 reactions are defined as reactions related to vaccination severe enough to prevent normal activities.

Flu Vaccine For Older Adults

Flu short for influenza is a virus that can cause fever, chills, sore throat, stuffy nose, headache, and muscle aches. Flu is very serious when it gets in your lungs. Older adults are at a higher risk for developing serious complications from the flu, such as pneumonia.

The flu is easy to pass from person to person. The virus also changes over time, which means you can get it again. To ensure flu vaccines remain effective, the vaccine is updated every year.

Everyone age 6 months and older should get an annual flu vaccine, but the protection from a flu vaccine can lessen with time, especially in older adults. Still, you are less likely to become seriously ill or hospitalized with the flu if you get the vaccine. A flu vaccine is especially important if you have a chronic health condition such as heart disease or diabetes.

Ideally, you should get your vaccine by the end of October each year so you are protected when the flu season starts. It takes at least two weeks for the vaccine to be effective. However, if you have not received your flu vaccine by the end of October, its not too late flu season typically peaks in December or January. As long as the flu virus is spreading, getting vaccinated will help protect you.

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Who Should Not Get The Vaccine

It is safe for most people to get two doses of Shingrix. However, you should talk to your healthcare provider before getting the shingles vaccine if:

  • You are pregnant
  • You have severe allergies to any of the Shingrix ingredients
  • You have ever experienced a severe allergic reaction to Shingrix

If you have a mild sickness, such as a cold, its usually safe to get the shingles vaccine. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should wait until you feel better to get your next dose of Shingrix.

You should still get the shingles vaccine if you dont remember having the chickenpox virus in the past and if youve had shingles previously. Shingrix can protect you against developing shingles again in the future.

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What Is The Shingrix Vaccine

Prevent Shingles: Get Vaccinated

Shingrix is the U.S. Food and Drug Administrationapproved vaccine aimed to prevent shingles infection in individuals older than 50 years and adults aged 18 years and older who are or who will be at increased risk of shingles due to a disease or therapy that can compromise the immunity.

The Herpes Zoster virus is the same virus that causes chickenpox in children. The virus may remain dormant in the persons nerve roots and become active when the immunity wanes .

The reactivated virus causes shingles or Herpes Zoster, a painful condition characterized by painful red blisters over the body, rash, and/or fever.

  • A particular complication of shingles is postherpetic neuralgia, which persists for months after the infection subsides.
  • It is characterized by extreme pain at the former site of rash and lesions.
  • This pain may or may not respond to strong medications hence, a vaccine against shingles is required.

The Shingrix vaccine works by exposing the body to small doses of the inactive herpes virus. This stimulates the bodys immune system and helps the body to develop an immunity to herpes zoster or shingles.

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Who Should Get The Shingles Vaccine

The CDC recommends all healthy adults ages 50 years and older get two doses of the shingles vaccine to prevent shingles and problems that can develop after youve had the disease. The two doses should be separated by two to six months. You should get the shingles vaccine even if you:

  • Have had shingles: If youve had shingles in the past, you should get the shingles vaccine to help prevent getting the disease again. You should wait until the shingles rash is gone before getting the vaccine.
  • Arent sure if youve had chickenpox: Studies show more than 99% of Americans ages 40 and older have had chickenpox at some point in their lives. You should get the shingles vaccine whether or not you remember having chickenpox because theyre caused by the same virus.
  • Received the old shingles vaccine : Before November 18, 2020, people were vaccinated with a shingles vaccine called Zostavax. You cant get Zostavax in the United States anymore. If you were vaccinated with Zostavax, you should get vaccinated with the new shingles vaccine, Shingrix.

Who Should Get Zostavax

People 60 years of age or older should get shingles vaccine . They should get the vaccine whether or not they recall having had chickenpox, which is caused by the same virus as shingles. Studies show that more than 99% of Americans aged 40 and older have had chickenpox, even if they dont remember getting the disease. There is no maximum age for getting shingles vaccine.

Two vaccines are licensed and recommended to prevent shingles in the U.S.. Zoster vaccine live has been in use since 2006. Recombinant zoster vaccine , has been in use since 2017 and is recommended by ACIP as the preferred shingles vaccine.

Even if you have had shingles, you can still receive shingles vaccine to help prevent future occurrences of the disease. There is no specific length of time you must wait after having shingles before receiving shingles vaccine, but generally you should make sure the shingles rash has disappeared before getting vaccinated. The decision on when to get vaccinated should be made with your healthcare provider.

Talk with your healthcare provider if you have questions about shingles vaccine. Shingles vaccine is available in doctors offices and pharmacies. To find doctors offices or pharmacies near you that offer the vaccine, visit Zostavax or HealthMap Vaccine Finder.

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Should You Get Shingrix If You Had The Zostavax Shingles Vaccine

It is recommended that you get two doses of Shingrix even if you got a different shingles vaccine in the past. Before Shingrix was approved, the Zostavax shingles vaccine was available. It was discontinued in November 2020 as Shingrix is much more effective. If you had the Zostavax vaccine, talk to your healthcare provider about getting Shingrix.

Zostavax And The Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

COVID-19 increases your chance for getting Shingles, doctors strongly advise both vaccines

The Summary of Product Characteristics for Zostavax, the shingles vaccine used in the UK, states that the vaccine should not be given at the same time as the Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine . This is because a clinical trial by the manufacturer had suggested this might make Zostavax less effective. However, the Department of Health advice is that the two vaccines can be given at the same time. This is based on expert advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation , and on research that showed no evidence that people receiving both vaccines together had any increased risk of developing shingles. Read the abstract of the 2011 study by Tseng et al .

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Persons With No Documented History Of Varicella Varicella Vaccination Or Herpes Zoster

Shingles is caused by VZV . After a person recovers from varicella, the virus stays dormant in their body. The virus can reactivate years or decades later, causing shingles.

  • Persons who have neither experienced varicella nor received varicella vaccine are not at risk for shingles.
  • More than 99% of Americans born before 1980 have had varicella, even if they dont remember it .
  • Children and adolescents who have received live-attenuated varicella vaccines are at lower risk for shingles than are those who experienced varicella .

RZV is not indicated and has not been studied for the prevention of varicella.

  • Receipt of RZV is not considered proof of prior varicella disease or varicella immunity.
  • RZV cannot be considered as either of the two doses of the varicella vaccine series.

For immunocompromised persons, evidence of immunity to varicella includes:

  • Documentation of two doses of varicella vaccine, or
  • Laboratory evidence of immunity or laboratory confirmation of disease, or
  • Diagnosis or verification of a history of varicella or herpes zoster by a healthcare provider.

It is important to note that:

For immunocompromised adults with no documented history of varicella, varicella vaccination, or shingles:

Conditions Treated By Shingrix And Zostavax

Shingrix and Zostavax are FDA-approved to prevent shingles . Both vaccines are indicated to prevent shingles in adults aged 50 years and older. However, unlike Zostavax, Shingrix is also approved to prevent shingles in immunocompromised or immunodeficient adults aged 18 years and older.

Shingrix and Zostavax are approved for preventative purposes only. They are not approved to treat shingles. In addition, they are not used to prevent primary varicella infection, also known as chickenpox.

Postherpetic neuralgia is a common type of nerve pain that arises with shingles. Because Shingrix and Zostavax can prevent shingles, they can also prevent postherpetic neuralgia and other painful complications from shingles. However, these vaccines are not labeled to treat PHN.

Condition
Yes

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Who Should Not Get Shingrix

You should not get Shingrix if you:

  • Have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine or after a dose of Shingrix.
  • Currently have shingles.
  • Currently are pregnant. Women who are pregnant should wait to get Shingrix.

If you have a minor illness, such as a cold, you may get Shingrix. But if you have a moderate or severe illness, with or without fever, you should usually wait until you recover before getting the vaccine.

Shingrix Vs Zostavax: Differences Similarities And Which Is Better For You

Vaccine can prevent shingles

Drug overview & main differences | Conditions treated | Efficacy | Insurance coverage and cost comparison | Side effects | Drug interactions | Warnings | FAQ

In March 2021, the FDA approved a safety labeling change for Shingrix. The label now contains a warning about a possible increased risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome with Shingrix. However, the FDA affirms the benefits of the vaccine continue to outweigh the risks. Read more about the FDA warning here.

In addition, Zostavax has been discontinued in the U.S. as of November 2020. The original post has been preserved for informational purposes only.

Shingrix and Zostavax are vaccines that can be given to prevent herpes zoster, more commonly known as shingles. A shingles vaccine is recommended for adults once they turn 50, and it can help prevent the rash and other complications associated with shingles.

Most people have been infected with the varicella-zoster virus if theyve ever had chickenpox. After chickenpox resolves, the varicella-zoster virus lies dormant in the body for years, if not forever. Later in life, the virus can reactivate as shingles and cause a painful rash that usually wraps around the face or torso.

Although Shingrix and Zostavax work in similar ways to prevent shingles, there are some important differences between the two.

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