Tuesday, April 9, 2024

New Shingles Vaccine Vs Old One

When Will Shingrix Be Available

Shingles: What you need to know about causes, symptoms, and prevention.

Both brands were listed in the Pharmaceutical Schedule from 1 August 2022, but the Shingrix vaccine will only be made available for funded patients once all stock of Zostavax has been used. We expect this to be in August or September 2022.

Immunisation providers should continue to use their current stock of Zostavax and continue to order Zostavax until it is no longer available from the Regional Vaccine Store. Zostavax will continue to be listed in the Pharmaceutical Schedule for several months so that providers can use up all Zostavax stock they have on hand.

What Everyone Should Know About The Shingles Vaccine

Shingles vaccination is the only way to protect against shingles and postherpetic neuralgia , the most common complication from shingles.

CDC recommends that adults 50 years and older get two doses of the shingles vaccine called Shingrix to prevent shingles and the complications from the disease. Adults 19 years and older who have weakened immune systems because of disease or therapy should also get two doses of Shingrix, as they have a higher risk of getting shingles and related complications.

Your doctor or pharmacist can give you Shingrix as a shot in your upper arm.

Shingrix provides strong protection against shingles and PHN. In adults 50 years and older who have healthy immune systems, Shingrix is more than 90% effective at preventing shingles and PHN. Immunity stays strong for at least the first 7 years after vaccination. In adults with weakened immune systems, studies show that Shingrix is 68%-91% effective in preventing shingles, depending on the condition that affects the immune system.

Who Shouldnt Get The Shingles Vaccine

There are a few situations in which shingles vaccination may not be right for you. You should not get Shingrix if youâve ever had a severe reaction to a vaccine. This means you had trouble breathing or swelling in your mouth or airway, a life-threatening condition called anaphylaxis.

You should also skip Shingrix if:

  • You have allergies to any parts of the vaccine. These include gelatin and the antibiotic neomycin. If you have other allergies, tell your doctor or pharmacist about them before you get Shingrix.
  • You currently have shingles or another illness. You can get the vaccine when youâre well.
  • You are pregnant or breastfeeding. You should wait until youâve stopped breastfeeding to get vaccinated.
  • You happened to test negative for VZV, the virus that causes chickenpox. If youâre older than 50, you probably had chickenpox even if you donât remember it. The CDC does not recommend testing for this. However, if a blood test shows youâve never had the childhood illness, you should get the chickenpox vaccine instead.

If you have a disease or take medications that affect your immune system, talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of Shingrix.

âItâs an individualized decision based on factors such as the specific medications and conditions of the person sitting in front of you,â Kistler says. She often consults with her patientsâ specialist doctors to make decisions about Shingrix.

Read Also: How Long Is The Shingles Vaccine Good For

Is Shingrix Or Zostavax Better

Shingrix is more effective than Zostavax. Shingrix is 97% effective at preventing shingles in adults aged 50 to 69 years old, whereas Zostavax is only 70% effective at preventing shingles in the same age group. Shingrix consistently prevents shingles in older adults, while the effectiveness of Zostavax decreases with increasing age. However, Shingrix may cause more systemic side effects than Zostavax.

A Nasty Persistent Condition

Should Older Adults Be Vaccinated Against Chickenpox?

Dr. Navjot Jain, an internal medicine specialist at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, says shingles is an offshoot of the chicken pox virus.

While many people have experienced chicken pox and therefore have the dormant virus, those who experienced chicken pox before they were 18-months old are considered to be at a higher risk .

Basically, shingles is the activation of the varicella zoster virus, which causes chicken pox, Jain told Healthline. Herpes zoster, which causes the vesicular rash associated with shingles, is a reactivation of the varicella zoster virus.

Even after the initial painful rash caused by shingles dies down, the aftereffects can be even worse.

The most common thing that we see after shingles is something called postherpetic neuralgia, which is nerve pain that can last for months, typically 90 days or more, and sometimes for several years, said Jain. Its excruciating pain at the site of where the patient would have previously had the shingles rash.

The agony of postherpetic neuralgia is often enough to convince patients to get vaccinated against shingles, says Jain.

Theres also the fact that a subtype of shingles, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, occurs in about 15 percent of shingles cases. In rare cases, says Jain, this can lead to vision loss.

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Very Common And Common Adverse Events

Very common adverse events occur in 10% or more of vaccinees. Common adverse events occur in 1% to less than 10% of vaccinees.

Injection site reactions are very commonly reported for both LZV and RZV. For LZV recipients the frequency is slightly higher in adults aged < 60 years. For all ages, the majority of these events were rated mild or moderate in intensity and lasted less than 2 days.

Due to the adjuvant in RZV, which induces a high cellular immune response and helps address the natural age-related decline in immunity, RZV is more reactogenic than LZV.

Injection site AEs are very commonly reported by recipients of RZV. Approximately 80% report injection-site pain and approximately 30% report redness at the site of injection.

Systemic adverse events, primarily fatigue and myalgia are common in LZV recipients and very common in RZV recipients . For RZV, they include headache .

Local and systemic reactions that were severe enough to interfere with normal activities have been more frequently reported following the receipt of RZV than LZV. However, these reactions have been temporary . Patient education on the short-term reactogenicity of the RZV is recommended prior to vaccine administration to promote adherence to the second dose.

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Shingrix

Studies show that Shingrix is safe. The vaccine helps your body create a strong defense against shingles. As a result, you are likely to have temporary side effects from getting the shots. The side effects might affect your ability to do normal daily activities for 2 to 3 days.

Most people got a sore arm with mild or moderate pain after getting Shingrix, and some also had redness and swelling where they got the shot. Some people felt tired, had muscle pain, a headache, shivering, fever, stomach pain, or nausea. Some people who got Shingrix experienced side effects that prevented them from doing regular activities. Symptoms went away on their own in about 2 to 3 days. Side effects were more common in younger people.

You might have a reaction to the first or second dose of Shingrix, or both doses. If you experience side effects, you may choose to take over-the-counter pain medicine such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

Guillain-Barré syndrome , a serious nervous system disorder, has been reported very rarely after Shingrix. There is also a very small increased risk of GBS after having shingles.

If you experience side effects from Shingrix, you should report them to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System . Your doctor might file this report, or you can do it yourself through the VAERS websiteexternal icon, or by calling 1-800-822-7967.

If you have any questions about side effects from Shingrix, talk with your doctor.

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What Else To Know About The Shingles Vaccine

Ready to get vaccinated? This is the essential info on how the shots are given, what to expect with side effects, and more.

You need two doses of Shingrix to get full protection from shingles. You should get your second dose 2 to 6 months after the first. Your doctor or pharmacist will inject the vaccine into the muscle of your upper arm, so wear clothes that give easy access to that area.

If it has been more than 6 months since you got your first dose, go ahead and get your second dose. You donât need to start over, Dooling says.

Because Shingrix is so new, experts arenât sure whether youâll eventually need another shot, or a booster, years down the road.

âThe CDC is actively following how protected people remain after the two-dose series,â she says. We know that after 4 years, protection remains above 85%. Only time will tell how durable that protection is.â

You do not have to wait between Shingrix and COVID-19 vaccination. The CDC has determined its safe to get the COVID-19 vaccine at the same time as Shingrex, but recommends they be given in different arms. You should not get eithe vaccine if you have COVID.

Side effects are fairly common. You may have heard that people sometimes have unpleasant side effects soon after they get the shingles vaccine.

âShingrix tends to have has more side effects than some vaccines, like those for the seasonal flu,â says Kistler. The shingles vaccine may cause:

How Well Does Shingrix Work

The new shingles vaccine giving hope to over-50s | 7NEWS

Two doses of Shingrix provide strong protection against shingles and postherpetic neuralgia , the most common complication of shingles.

  • In adults 50 to 69 years old with healthy immune systems, Shingrix was 97% effective in preventing shingles in adults 70 years and older, Shingrix was 91% effective.
  • In adults 50 years and older, Shingrix was 91% effective in preventing PHN in adults 70 years and older, Shingrix was 89% effective.
  • In adults with weakened immune systems, Shingrix was between 68% and 91% effective in preventing shingles, depending on their underlying immunocompromising condition.

In people 70 years and older who had healthy immune systems, Shingrix immunity remained high throughout 7 years following vaccination.

Read Also: Where To Get The Shingles Vaccine For Free

Mayo Clinic Q And A: New Shingles Vaccine Recommended For Most Adults Over Age 50

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: How effective is the shingles vaccine? Who should get it? Is it recommended even for those who have already had shingles?

ANSWER: A new vaccine, called Shingrix, is now available thats very effective in preventing shingles. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone age 50 and older with a healthy immune system receive this vaccine, whether youve had shingles before or not.

Unlike the other vaccine thats been available for shingles since 2006, called Zostavax, this new vaccine is inactivated. That means it does not contain a live virus. Because of that, it is safe in people who have weakened immune systems. However, the CDC has not yet made recommendations for Shingrix vaccination in these individuals. If you have a weakened immune system, talk to your health care provider about your vaccination options for shingles.

Shingles is caused by a virus called varicella-zoster. When youre first infected with this virus, it causes the itchy rash known as chickenpox. Although chickenpox is uncomfortable, most people recover from it without any lasting problems. But after the rash of chickenpox goes away, the virus does not. Instead, the varicella-zoster virus goes into hiding in your bodys nerve cells.

New Shingles Vaccine Over 90% Effective

Shingles is a painful rash on the skin that comes from the same virus that causes chickenpox.

Recently, shingles has made headlines because of a new vaccine that was approved in 2017: the recombinant zoster vaccine, or Shingrix.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , two doses of the new vaccine are more than 90 percent effective at preventing shingles and its side effects.

Shingles is a painful, often debilitating rash that affects roughly 1 million people each year. Luckily, getting vaccinated can help you prevent it and stop shingles from spreading.

To help explain more about how shingles spreads and what it is, weve gathered key information from MedlinePlus and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Recommended Reading: How Do You Clean Shingles Blisters

Are There Any Complications Associated With Zostavax

People taking the Zostavax medication have reported experiencing some of the following complications and side effects:

  • joint and muscle pain.11

In addition, thousands of Zostavax lawsuits have been filed against the drugs manufacturer Merck & Co Inc. Pharmaceuticals since 2016. The plaintiffs in these lawsuits allege that, in addition to the above complications, the medication causes:

  • neurological diseases or disorders, like brain inflammation and brain damage,
  • spinal cord inflammation ,
  • liver damage and liver failure, and

Zostavax may also cause immunocompromised patients to develop shingles.

The medicine is not recommended for people under the age of 50. In addition, the drug is not recommended for the following two categories of people:

  • persons who have experienced a life-threatening reaction to gelatin, neomycin, or any other component of shingles vaccine, and
  • persons with a weakened immune system due to certain conditions.12
  • How Does The New Vaccine Work

    Podcast Ep 8: Pneumonia, Herpes Zoster, Endocarditis &  more ...

    Shingrix contains broken-down parts of the virus which then allow the body to build up immunity to the virus. When the body confronts the actual virus in the future, it mounts a response to keep the infection at bay. The vaccine also contains molecules that make the bodys immune response stronger and last longer.

    For these reasons, Shingrix provides better and longer-lasting protection against both shingles and PHN than the older vaccine, Zostavax.

    Protection from the older vaccine wore off after approximately eight years, but we believe Shingrix to last much longer.

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    What Is The Brand Name Of The Shingles Vaccine

    There are 2 shingles vaccines used in the UK:

    • Zostavax, a live vaccine given as 1 dose
    • Shingrix, a non-live vaccine given as 2 doses, 2 months apart

    Most people will have the Zostavax vaccine. The Shingrix vaccine is recommended if Zostavax is not suitable for you, for example if you have a condition that affects your immune system.

    You can read more about the shingles vaccines in the patient information leaflets:

    Is Shingrix Or Zostavax More Effective

    Shingrix and Zostavax have both been proven to prevent shingles. However, Shingrix is a newer vaccine that is considered more effective than Zostavax. Shingrix is even recommended for those who have already received the Zostavax vaccine in the past.

    Clinical trials have shown that Shingrix is around 97% effective at preventing shingles in adults aged 50 to 69 years old. Shingrix is also effective in preventing shingles in older adultsin adults over the age of 70, Shingrix was found to be around 90% effective.

    Zostavax has a 70% efficacy rate in preventing shingles in adults aged 50 to 69 years old, according to the Zoster Efficacy and Safety Trial . Results from the Shingles Prevention Study showed that, overall, Zostavax is 51% effective against shingles in adults older than 60 years old. However, the effectiveness of Zostavax . Zostavax is 64% effective in adults aged 60 to 69 years old, 41% effective in adults aged 70 to 79 years old, and 18% effective in adults aged 80 years and older.

    Your healthcare provider will recommend Shingrix over Zostavax, as Shingrix is the preferred shingles vaccine and Zostavax is no longer available. Shingrix is especially recommended for immunocompromised patients since it is a non-live vaccine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about the right shingles vaccine for you.

    Read Also: How Old To Get Shingles Shot

    Who Should Get Shingrix

    Adults 50 years and older should get two doses of Shingrix, separated by 2 to 6 months. Adults 19 years and older who have or will have weakened immune systems because of disease or therapy should also get two doses of Shingrix. If needed, people with weakened immune systems can get the second dose 1 to 2 months after the first.

    You should get Shingrix even if in the past you:

    • Received varicella vaccine

    There is no maximum age for getting Shingrix.

    If you had shingles in the past, Shingrix can help prevent future occurrences of the disease. There is no specific length of time that you need to wait after having shingles before you can receive Shingrix, but generally you should make sure the shingles rash has gone away before getting vaccinated.

    Chickenpox and shingles are related because they are caused by the same virus . After a person recovers from chickenpox, the virus stays dormant in the body. It can reactivate years later and cause shingles.

    Shingrix is available in doctors offices and pharmacies.

    If you have questions about Shingrix, talk with your healthcare provider.

    * A shingles vaccine called zoster vaccine live is no longer available for use in the United States, as of November 18, 2020. If you had Zostavax in the past, you should still get Shingrix. Talk to your healthcare provider to determine the best time to get Shingrix.

    Who Should Not Get Shingrix

    New Shingles Vaccine

    You should not get Shingrix if you:

    • Have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any component of the vaccine or after a dose of Shingrix.
    • Currently have shingles.
    • Currently are pregnant. Women who are pregnant should wait to get Shingrix.

    If you have a minor illness, such as a cold, you may get Shingrix. But if you have a moderate or severe illness, with or without fever, you should usually wait until you recover before getting the vaccine.

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    What Are The Side Effects

    The shingles vaccines are very safe.

    Common side effects to the vaccines include headache as well as soreness, redness and swelling where the vaccine was given. Itching and a rash may also occur after getting Zostavax® II. Other reactions that may occur after getting Shingrix® include fever, muscle soreness, fatigue, shivering, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

    It is important to stay in the clinic for 15 minutes after getting any vaccine because there is an extremely rare possibility of anaphylaxis, which is a life-threatening allergic reaction. This may include hives, difficulty breathing, or swelling of the throat, tongue, or lips. The chance of true anaphylaxis is about 1 in 1 million vaccine doses. Should this reaction occur, your health care provider is prepared to treat it. Emergency treatment includes administration of epinephrine and transfer by ambulance to the nearest emergency department. If symptoms develop after you leave the clinic, call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number. Learn more about anaphylaxis on our vaccine side effects page.

    It is important to always report serious or unexpected reactions to your health care provider.

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